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  1. Creating a layer stack
  2. Combining two exposures with a Hide All layer mask
  3. Using a Reveal All layer mask to combine two exposures
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Using a Reveal All layer mask to combine two exposures

As I noted back on page 43, if you reverse the order of your layers in the stack—putting the “Graffiti” layer on top and the “Light Rim” layer underneath—you could use a white Reveal All layer mask and come up with the same results as shown on page 46.

To demonstrate this with the Oakland Pipes image:

  1. Put the “Graffiti” image on the top of the layer stack by dragging the layer up in the Layers panel. This leaves the “Light Rim” layer on the bottom.

    047fig01.jpg
  2. With the “Graffiti” layer selected in the Layers panel, select Layer ► Layer Mask ► Reveal All. A white Reveal All layer mask will appear attached to the layer. The layer mask makes the “Graffiti” layer visible and hides the “Light Rim” layer underneath.

    047fig02.jpg
  3. Select the Brush Tool from the Tool panel and set the Brush Tool tool-brush.jpg to the width of the pipe rims. Set the Foreground color in the Tool panel to black and the Brush Tool’s Hardness setting to 0%. Then, use the Options Bar to set the brush Opacity to 50% and the Flow to 50%.
  4. With the white Reveal All layer mask selected in the Layers panel, paint in the image window along the pipe rims. As you paint with black the lighter pipe rims from the “Light Rim” layer will become visible.

    047fig03.jpg

It is worth taking a moment or two to compare the two scenarios—using a black Hide All layer mask (page 46) and a white Reveal All layer mask—until you are sure you understand why the two approaches lead to an identical result. The finished image is shown on pages 48–49.

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