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Adding Prefixes to Page Numbering in Generated Lists in FrameMaker

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New Riders author and FrameMaker expert Lisa Jahred shows you how to add prefixes to page numbers referenced in the table of contents or index list. You also learn how to add a text prefix to page numbers in generated files.
This article was excerpted from Framemaker 6: Beyond the Basics, by Lisa Jahred.
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If your document pages are numbered from 1 through n, regardless of the specific chapter numbers that head up each chapter or document file, you'll love using FrameMaker's default table of contents or index list.

If your documents use chapter-based page numbering, you'll have to fine-tune the default table of contents or index list. With chapter-based numbering, each page number depends on the chapter-number heading of each chapter or document file. For example, page numbers in Chapter 3 would be displayed as 3-1, 3-2, 3-3 ... 3-49, 3-50, and so on. Therefore, you want the table of contents or index page references to include those chapter-based page numbers or the page numbers will fail to make sense.

Just because you use chapter-based page numbering in documents does not mean that generated lists will automatically implement that same page numbering.

This article explores how to add prefixes to page numbers referenced in the table of contents or index list. You also learn how to add a text prefix to page numbers in generated files.

Chapter-Based Page Numbering

You must consider two features when you incorporate chapter-based page numbering into generated files:

  • The Document Number Property for chapter in the individual file(s) that are used as source information for the table of contents

  • Redefining the Building Block structure on the TOC reference page for the table of contents and the IX reference page for the index list

Take a look at how these two features work together to get you the result for which you are looking. For this example, suppose you're creating a table of contents or index for a book file that contains many document files. Each page is numbered according to chapter-based numbering.

Working with Chapter Numbering Properties

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Book file settings override the settings for individual files.

Although it makes sense to use <$chapnum> in autonumber formats of paragraphs in document files, you can still use this method if you have not used <$chapnum> in autonumber formats. <$chapnum> represents the chapter number and corresponds to Format > Document > Numbering > Chapter. This setting does not affect other placeholder autonumbering that you might have used (such as or < n+>).

After you display the Numbering Properties for chapter, you can either set the chapter number to a specific number, or if you are working with a book file, you can set the chapter number to "Continue numbering from previous file in book." If you choose the second selection, the chapter numbers update only after you update the book file.

Setting Up the TOC Reference Page Building Blocks

After you set up the Chapter Numbering Properties for each individual file, go to the table of contents reference page and add a new Building Block to each line of the Building Block structure.

The Building Block structure produces the default page numbers. The structure looks like this on the reference page:

<$paranum>\t<$paratext>\t<$pagenum>

That structure provides this result in the table of contents:

3.1 The Language of Running 1

3.2 Understanding Pace 2

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You must update the table of contents to see the results from the Building Block changes.

Now add <$chapnum> - just before the <$pagenum> Building Block. <$chapnum> represents the chapter number that you assigned in Chapter Numbering Properties for each individual file. (Consider using the dash to separate the chapter number from the page number.)

The following Building Blocks on the table of contents reference page

<$paranum>\t<$paratext>\t<$chapnum>-<$pagenum>

produce this result in the table of contents list:

3.1 The Language of Running 3-1

3.2 Understanding Pace 3-2

Use this method for most generated lists, such as list of figures or list of tables.

Setting Up the IX Reference Page Building Blocks

This exercise teaches you how to add a prefix to an index entry page number and begins on the IX reference page of the Index list:

  1. Place the insertion cursor just before the Building Block <$pagenum>. The insertion cursor is placed just before the left pointy bracket of the <$pagenum> Building Block. <$pagenum> represents the page number of each index entry.

  2. Type <$chapnum>-. <$chapnum> represents the chapter number for each document file containing the source marker text of the index. The dash (-) is the character used to separate the chapter number from the page number: 9-1, 9-2, and so on. You can type any character you want. For example, you might choose to use a decimal (.), as in 9.1, 9.2, and so on.

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You can select Format > Document > Numbering to set up a chapter or volume number of individual document files.

The next time you update the index file from either the book file or the single file, the chapter prefix is added to the page number of each index entry that was generated from the same marker type represented by the <$pagenum> Building Block paragraph tag name.

If you want to use the Volume number instead, just replace <$chapnum> with <$volnum> on the IX reference page, as in <$volnum>-<$pagenum>. Or, you can combine the volume, chapter numbers, and text to display in the index:

Vol. , - <$volnum>, <$chapnum>-<$pagenum>

to look something like this:

Color Definitions
Pantone Vol. 2, 9-1

To incorporate multiple page number styles in a generated index, see the article titled "Working with Multiple Page Number Styles in an Index."

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