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This chapter is from the book

Fonts

Find That Wascally Missing Font

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InDesign says a font is missing, but I don't see any telltale pink highlighting in my document. Now what?

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Go to the Type menu and choose Find Font, which opens a dialog box listing all the fonts used in the active document. Entries for missing fonts carry a yellow warning icon and appear at the top of the list. Select one of these MIAs and click the Find First button. InDesign jumps to the first character or character run using that font in the document and highlights them.

To replace missing fonts with ones you have, choose a font at the bottom of the dialog box. Don't forget to click the Change or Change All buttons; if you choose a replacement font and just click the Okay button to close the dialog box, InDesign doesn't change anything.

Sometimes, though, when you click the Find button, InDesign appears to do something in the layout, yet you can't see any highlighted text.

In this case, the bad boy is probably a difficult-to-spot space or non-printing special character (like a paragraph return), it's hiding in a frame's overset text, or it's the character “assigned” to an inline table or graphic. In all these cases, InDesign has difficulty showing you the location of the problem.

Our colleague Dave Saunders came up with a good tip for this: After you click the Find button, you can assume your text cursor is at the right place. Close the Find Font dialog box. Don't click anywhere — immediately choose Edit > Edit in Story Editor, and the blinking cursor will be at the location of the missing font.

Find the Font that Appears in Other Program's Font Menus

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As far as I know, the font I want to use is loaded and active; and indeed I can choose it from other programs' font menus. But it doesn't appear in InDesign's font list.

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InDesign's font menu doesn't simply list all fonts alphabetically; some are grouped separately toward the bottom of the list because they're a different class of fonts (foreign language fonts for example), and often the type foundry's name is ignored in the alpha sort (ITC Oficina is listed in the O's, not the I's). So if at first you don't see a font, keep looking.

If you still don't see it, then go looking on your hard drive. Some programs install their own private fonts folder and set of fonts when the program itself is installed. Microsoft does this, so do some individual Adobe applications. Check your program's documentation or search your hard drive to see where the font is located. Unless it's in a special “required” folder, you can usually move it to a common fonts folder that all programs can access without a problem.

Unbold Bold-Looking Type

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I don't know what I did, but suddenly some of the text in the frame I was working in became very chunky, as though I had applied “Bold Ugly” style. According to the Typeface style field, though, it's a regular Book font.

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You accidentally applied a stroke to the type. Select the characters and look at the Stroke icon at the bottom of the Tools palette, or the Stroke icon at the top of the Swatches palette. If the “T” there has an outline, there's your problem. Click the Stroke icon to bring it to the front if necessary, and click the [None] color to fix it (Figure 3-15, next page).

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Figure 3-15 Type looking globby? Check the Stroke icon in the Tools palette. If the T is outlined (top), you've accidentally applied a stroke color. Change it to None (bottom) and the globbiness should be gone.

Smooth Font Display

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Why does the type look jaggy in this particular document? All of it looks bad, regardless of the typeface. InDesign isn't reporting any missing fonts.

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Go to View > Display Performance and make sure it's set to Typical or High Quality. If it's set to Optimized (in CS) or Fast Display (in CS2), that means that text anti-aliasing (smoothing) is turned off.

Alternately, go to the Display Performance panel of the Preferences dialog box, and make sure that the Enable Anti-Aliasing checkbox is checked for your current View setting.

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