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This chapter is from the book

Flagging Photos

Flagging your photos as soon as you import them lets you quickly mark poor-quality photos as rejects (a black flag) and nicer ones as picks (a white flag). You need to be the toughest judge of your work at this point. Otherwise, you’ll eventually clog up your hard drive with bad and so-so photos. Whether you start by marking your rejects or your picks is up to you. I find the process goes faster marking the rejects first. I also hold off actually deleting photos until after a complete review.

To mark rejects:

  1. In the Filmstrip or any of the four view modes (Grid, Loupe, Survey, or Compare), select one or more photos you want to mark as rejected. Then, depending on your view and toolbar settings, do one of the following:

    • Right-click (Control-click on a Mac) a photo and in the pop-up menu, choose Set Flag > Rejected (Figure 4.25).

      Figure 4.25

      Figure 4.25 To mark rejects, right-click (Control-click on a Mac) a photo and choose Set Flag > Rejected.

    • Press the X on your keyboard.
    • If you’re in the Grid view, click the upper-left corner of one of the selected images and choose Rejected in the pop-up menu (Figure 4.26).

      Figure 4.26

      Figure 4.26 In the Grid view, you can click the upper-left corner of a selected image and choose Rejected.

    • If you’re in the Compare view, click the black flag at the bottom left of the photo you want to mark as rejected (Figure 4.27).

      Figure 4.27

      Figure 4.27 In the Compare view, click the black flag at the bottom left of the photo you want to mark as rejected.

    • If the flagging option for the Library module toolbar is active, click the black flag in the toolbar (Figure 4.28).

      Figure 4.28

      Figure 4.28 If the flagging option for the Library module toolbar is active, you can click the black flag in the toolbar.

  2. The rejected photo(s) are marked with a black flag and, in the Filmstrip and Grid view, dimmed compared to unrejected photos (Figure 4.29).

    Figure 4.29

    Figure 4.29 A rejected photo is marked with a black flag and appears dimmed.

To mark picks:

  1. In the Filmstrip or any of the four view modes (Grid, Loupe, Survey, or Compare), select one or more photos you want to mark as flagged. Then, depending on your view and toolbar settings, do one of the following:

    • Right-click (Control-click on a Mac) and in the pop-up menu, choose Set Flag > Flagged.
    • Press the P on your keyboard.
    • If you’re in the Grid view, click the upper-left corner of one of the selected images and select Flagged in the pop-up menu.
    • If you’re in the Compare view, click the white flag at the bottom left of the photo (Figure 4.30).

      Figure 4.30

      Figure 4.30 In the Compare view, click the white flag at the bottom left of the photo you want to mark as picked.

    • If the flagging option for the Library module toolbar is active, click the white flag in the toolbar.
  2. The white flag appears by the picked photo(s) (Figure 4.31).

    Figure 4.31

    Figure 4.31 White flags mark your picks; black flags mark your rejects, which also are dimmed.

To mark photos using the Painter tool:

  1. Turn on the toolbar (View > Show Toolbar or press the T on your keyboard).
  2. Click the triangle at the far right of the toolbar and choose Painter in the pop-up menu (Figure 4.32).

    Figure 4.32

    Figure 4.32 To mark photos using the Painter tool, click the triangle at the far right of the toolbar and choose Painter.

  3. Click the Painter tool (the spray can) in the toolbar (Figure 4.33).

    Figure 4.33

    Figure 4.33 Click the spray can in the toolbar to activate the Painter tool.

  4. Click the Paint pop-up menu that appears and choose Flag (Figure 4.34). Click the second Paint pop-up menu that now appears and make a choice based on whether you want to mark photos as Flagged, Unflagged, or Rejected (Figure 4.35).

    Figure 4.34

    Figure 4.34 Click the Paint pop-up menu that appears and choose Flag.

    Figure 4.35

    Figure 4.35 Use the second Paint pop-up menu to choose whether you want to mark photos as Flagged, Unflagged, or Rejected.

  5. In the main window, find a photo you want to mark, position your cursor (now a little spray can) over it (left, Figure 4.36). Click once and the photo is dimmed and the cursor changes from a spray can to an eraser (right, Figure 4.36).

    Figure 4.36

    Figure 4.36 Position the spray can over a photo and click once (left). The photo is dimmed and the cursor changes into an eraser (right).

    A flag appears in the photo’s upper left, along with a note confirming your action. (What appears is based on your step 4 choice; in the example, a black flag and the related Set as Rejected note appear (Figure 4.37).)

    Figure 4.37

    Figure 4.37 A flag appears in the photo’s upper left, along with a note confirming your action.

  6. To mark another photo, repeat steps 4 and 5. Or to quickly mark multiple photos, click once and drag the cursor over those photos (Figure 4.38).

    Figure 4.38

    Figure 4.38 To mark several photos, click and drag the cursor over them. A note confirms the action.

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