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Apple Pro Training Series: Final Cut Pro 7 Quick-Reference Guide: Ingest

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Brendan Boykin shows you the three ways you can bring media into Final Cut Pro.
This chapter is from the book

You can bring media into Final Cut Pro in three ways:

  • Capture
  • Transfer
  • Import

Capture and transfer involve copying/transcoding media into the scratch disk. Import does not copy media—the original media, such as stills or music, is simply referenced inside the project.

Capturing from Tape

You can get media off tape into a Final Cut Pro project using three capture methods:

  • Now
  • Clip
  • Batch

All three result in clips for use in Final Cut Pro. The three differ in their speed and accuracy in creating those clips.

Setup for Tape Capture

Before digging into the three methods of capturing, there are a few settings to review.

  1. Choose File > Log and Capture.
  2. In the top right of the Log and Capture window, click the Clip Settings tab.
  3. Click the Capture Settings tab.
  4. Click the Logging tab.

Capture Now

Capture Now is the fastest, “dirtiest” method of creating clips from tape-based media. In essence, you are instructing Final Cut Pro to ingest whatever audio/video feed is coming in via FireWire or supported capture device to the scratch disk.

  1. In the Logging tab, enter the tape label into the Reel field, then press Return.
  2. Use the transport controls, or their keyboard equivalents, to cue your tape a few seconds before the clip you want to capture.
  3. Enter a name for the clip in the Description field.
  4. Start playback and then click the Now button in the center of the Capture button bar at the bottom right.
  5. When you see the desired clip finish, press Esc to stop the capture.

    The clip will appear in the logging bin of the project. The Log and Capture’s Name/Description fields will increment automatically, preparing you for the next capture.

  6. Repeat steps 2–5 to capture additional clips.
  7. When you have finished capturing, close the Log and Capture window. Then press Command-S to save your Final Cut Pro project file.

Capture Clip

Capture Clip, sometimes considered the slowest method of ingest, provides very precise clips. You mark an In point and an Out point representing the desired clip on the raw tape, and then you capture the marked media to your storage before marking the next clip. The “slow” part of the process is that you may do only one clip at a time—mark Clip A, capture Clip A, mark Clip B, capture Clip B, and so on.

  1. In the Logging tab, enter the tape label into the Reel field, then press Return.
  2. Use the transport controls, or their keyboard equivalents, to cue your tape to the beginning of the raw footage for the desired clip.
  3. Press the I key to mark an In point.
  4. Cue your tape a couple of seconds after the end of the desired clip.
  5. Press the O key to mark an Out point.
  6. To capture the clip, click Capture: Clip.
  7. In the Log Clip window that opens, name the clip, and then click OK.

    Final Cut Pro cues your tape and proceeds with capturing the marked clip onto the scratch disk. Once capture is completed, the clip is added to the logging bin in the project, and the Log and Capture’s Name and Description fields increment automatically, preparing for the next capture.

  8. Repeat steps 2–7 to capture additional clips.
  9. When you have finished capturing, close the Log and Capture window. Then press Command-S to save your Final Cut Pro project file.

Capture Batch

The process for Capture Batch, also known as batch capturing, starts with the same steps as Capture Clip. You mark In and Out points for a clip but then simply log the clip. You continue marking and logging multiple clips from one or many tapes before capturing those clips in one capture session.

  1. In the Logging tab, enter the tape label into the Reel field, then press Return.
  2. Use the transport controls to cue your tape prior to the beginning of the raw footage for the desired clip.
  3. Press the I key to mark an In point.
  4. Cue your tape a couple of seconds after the end of the desired clip.
  5. Press the O key to mark an Out point.
  6. Click Log Clip to log the clip into the project.
  7. In the Log Clip window that opens, name the clip, and then click OK.

    The clip becomes an offline clip in the active project.

  8. Repeat steps 2–7 to log additional clips.
  9. After you have logged your clips, select the offline clips in the project that you wish to batch capture.
  10. In the Log and Capture window, click Capture: Batch.
  11. In the Batch Capture window that opens, verify the Total Media Time and Total Disk Space, approximate the amount of footage you desire to capture, and then click OK.
  12. Load your raw footage tape, if necessary, and then select the respective reel (tape) in the Insert Reel window before clicking Continue.
  13. After Final Cut Pro successfully captures all clips from a reel, the Insert Reel window reappears. Load another requested tape, select the tape in the list, and then click Continue.
  14. After all reels have been captured, click Done in the Insert Reel dialog.

    The captured clips are updated in the Browser. Save your project.

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