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This chapter is from the book

Generated Files for Single Documents

The content for generated files is extracted from one or more source documents. You can generate TOCs and other generated lists for a book, but you can also generate a standalone file for a single document as the source.

Generating lists for a single document

You can generate files, such as a TOC or index, for single documents. You can also generate files for information purposes, for example, to see a list of condition tags used in the document.

To generate a TOC for a single document:

  1. From the Special menu of the document for which you want to generate a TOC, choose Table of Contents (Figure 13.80). A prompt appears to confirm that you want to create a standalone TOC.

    Figure 13.80Figure 13.80 In the document, choose Special > Table of Contents.

  2. Click Yes (Figure 13.81). The Set Up Table of Contents dialog box appears. Note that the Add File pop-up menu is inactive.

    Figure 13.81Figure 13.81 When prompted to confirm that you want to create a standalone TOC, click Yes.

  3. Move the paragraph tags you want to include in the TOC to the Include Paragraphs Tagged list (Figure 13.82).

    Figure 13.82Figure 13.82 Move paragraphs to the Include list. When you're finished, click Set.

  4. To add hypertext links from the TOC entry to the source of the paragraph in the document, select Create Hypertext Links.

  5. Click Set. FrameMaker generates the TOC, with the same page layout as the original file but with no paragraph formatting, and displays it (Figure 13.83).

    Figure 13.83Figure 13.83 The TOC has the same page layout as the original file and the paragraphs aren't formatted.

  6. Save the generated TOC in the same folder or use the Save As command to save it in a different location.

Tips

  • You can generate a standard index from a single document in much the same way as a TOC. Choose Special > Standard Index.

  • If you close a TOC or list that you generate from a single document without saving it the first time, the document disappears. You must save it the first time you generate it.

In addition to a TOC and a standard index, you can generate several types of lists. For example, you can generate a list of figure titles or table titles. One of the most widely used lists is a list of imported graphics.

To generate a list for a single document:

  1. From the Special menu of the document for which you want to generate a list, choose List Of > References (Figure 13.84). A prompt appears to confirm that you want to create a standalone list of references.

    Figure 13.84Figure 13.84 Choose Special > List Of > References.

  2. Click Yes (Figure 13.85). The Set Up List of References dialog box appears. Note that the Add File pop-up menu is inactive.

    Figure 13.85Figure 13.85 When prompted, click Yes.

  3. Move the items you want to include in the list to the Include References list (Figure 13.86).

    Figure 13.86Figure 13.86 In this example, move Imported Graphics to the Include list and click Set.

  4. To add hypertext links from the list entry to the source of the paragraph in the document, select Create Hypertext Links.

  5. Click Set. FrameMaker generates the list, with the same page layout as the original file but with no paragraph formatting, and displays it (Figure 13.87).

    Figure 13.87Figure 13.87 The list of references has the same page layout as the original file and the paragraphs aren't formatted.

  6. Save the generated list in the same folder, or use the Save As command to save it in a different location.

Tips

  • Lists present entries in the order in which paragraphs occur in the source document; indexes, such as an index of references (Figure 13.88), present entry paragraphs in alphabetical order.

    Figure 13.88Figure 13.88 Choose Special > Index Of > References.

  • Lists and indexes of references help you track special categories of information, such as a fonts used in the document (Figure 13.89). You can generate lists of all the items shown in Figure 13.90, including condition tags, external cross-references, publishers, text insets, unresolved cross-references, and unresolved text insets.

    Figure 13.89Figure 13.89 A list of references with fonts used in the document.

    Figure 13.90Figure 13.90 All of the special information about a document you can include in lists.

To add a title to a generated file:

  1. Type the title before the first entry on the first body page after you generate the file for the first time.

  2. Create a new paragraph format for the title, such as TOC Title or Index Title. Do not use a standard suffix, such as TOC, IX, or LOR, for this paragraph tag. When the file is regenerated, the title will remain in place as long as you haven't used a standard FrameMaker suffix (Figure 13.91).

    Figure 13.91Figure 13.91 The next time the TOC in this example is regenerated, the title, "Contents," will remain in place.

Updating standalone generated files and changing file setup

When a generated file is part of a book, it can be regenerated when you update the book. You can also update standalone generated lists.

To change the setup of or update a standalone TOC or list:

  1. Make changes in the document that is the source for the generated file.

  2. In the source document, from the Special menu, choose the same command you used to generate the file originally.

  3. When prompted to create a standalone document, click Yes.

  4. To change the setup, in the dialog box that appears, move items between lists (Figure 13.92).

    Figure 13.92Figure 13.92 To change the setup, move items between lists.

  5. Click Set. Entries in the generated file are updated reflect the new setup. Any formatting made in the file is retained.

Finding the source of an entry

When you spell check an index or other generated file, you might find a spelling error so, you'll need to correct the marker text entry. Or you might see some first-level that you should change to second-level. You could go to the page in the entry select marker symbols to find the right if you selected Create Hypertext Links you generated the file, you can easily find the source of an entry.

To find the source of a list entry by using a link:

  • In the generated list, Alt-Ctrl-click or Control-Option-click the page number in an entry (Figure 13.93). FrameMaker opens the source document, displays the page with the source paragraph or marker, and selects the source paragraph or marker (Figure 13.94).

    Figure 13.93Figure 13.93 Alt-Ctrl-click or Control-Option-click an entry ...

    Figure 13.94Figure 13.94 ... to go to the source.

Troubleshooting generated files

  • If you find a spelling or other error, go back to the source document, fix the error, and regenerate the file.

  • An empty entry in a TOC (Figure 13.95) means that you may have an empty paragraph in the source document tagged with an included tag. Delete the empty paragraph in the source document and regenerate the TOC.

    Figure 13.95Figure 13.95 Example of an empty TOC entry.

  • Because FrameMaker allows you to index a word automatically by inserting an index marker with no marker text (see page 282), if you insert an "empty" index marker, the index entry displays the next word from the source document (Figure 13.96). If you see a word that clearly doesn't belong in the index, this could be the problem. Go to its source and delete the index marker.

    Figure 13.96Figure 13.96 An example of a bogus index entry caused by an index marker with no marker text. An empty index marker has been accidentally inserted before the word "While" in the source document.

  • If a list contains an entry that doesn't appear to belong there, go to the source paragraph and check the entry's tag—you may need to apply a different tag so that the paragraph will not be included.

  • If an index is missing an entry, its marker may be a marker type other than Index. Go to the source and display the Marker window (choose Special > Marker). From the Marker Type pop-up menu, chooseIndex and click Edit Marker.

  • Double question marks in an index (Figure 13.97) mean that FrameMaker can find only one of the start or end markers or that the marker text doesn't match exactly (see page 283). Search for double question marks, and if you find them, check that you have both start and end range markers and that marker text is identical, including spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.

    Figure 13.97Figure 13.97 In this example, because the marker text doesn't match, FrameMaker thinks it's two different ranges with missing markers in each.

  • You can make changes in entries in generated lists, but the next time the list is updated, the change will be overwritten. If you find an error or something you want to change in a generated list, change the paragraph or marker text at its source and then regenerate the file.

Touching up generated files

While you are getting your files ready for print or PDF, you need to do a few thing in and the index after the content in files is frozen.

  • Fix bad line breaks. In a TOC, if a paragraph the source document contains a forced return, it will appear as an unneeded forced return (Figure 13.98). Delete the forced return symbol in the TOC (Figure 13.99).

    Figure 13.98Figure 13.98 Example of a forced return in a TOC chapter title entry.

    Figure 13.99Figure 13.99 After deleting the forced return.

  • Insert page breaks.

  • Visually inspect the file and apply any custom master pages, such as a Blank page for a last page with no entries.

Tips

  • Touch-up formatting is overwritten when you regenerate the file, so plan to perform touch-up work only at the end of the production process, when you won't be regenerating the file. Of course, if you need to create a draft document, you may want to touch up generated files, even though you know you'll have to repeat the process again (probably several more times) later.

  • Although many writers do this, it is not necessary to re-import formats from templates during final production. In fact, it's better practice not to do so. When you import formats from a template, you may accidentally impact parts of the document you don't intend to change.

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