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This chapter is from the book

Viewing Your Page in a Browser

Once you've created a page, you'll want to see what it looks like in a browser. In fact, since you don't know which browser your visitors will be using, it's a good idea to look at the page in several browsers.

To look at your page in a browser:

  1. Open a browser.

  2. Choose File > Open, Open File, or Open Page (just not Open Location), depending on the browser (Figure 2.21).

    Figure 21Figure 2.21 From the desired browser (this is Netscape for Windows), choose File > Open Page. In Explorer for Windows, it's called File > Open. In Explorer for Mac, it's File > Open File.


  3. In the dialog box that appears, either type the location of the page on your hard disk, or click Browse (IE) or Choose File (Netscape) to find it (Figure 2.22).

    Figure 22Figure 2.22 On Windows machines, you'll get an intermediary box asking if you want to type the path in by hand. If you don't (!), click the Choose File button (in IE, it's Browse). You'll get the dialog box shown in Figure 2.23.

  4. If you've clicked Browse or Choose File in step 3, in the new dialog box that appears, navigate to the folder on your hard disk that contains the desired Web page and click Open (Figure 2.23).

    Figure 23Figure 2.23 Choose the file that you want to open and click the Open button.

  5. Back in the Open Page dialog box, click Open. The page is displayed in the browser just as it will appear when you actually publish it on the server (see page 405).

    Figure 24Figure 2.24 The page appears in the browser. Check it over well to see if it's coming out the way you planned.


Tips

  • You can (usually) also double-click a Web page's icon to view it in a browser.

  • If your Web page does not appear in the Open dialog box, make sure that you have saved it as Text Only and given it the .htm or .html extension (see page 50).

  • You don't have to close the document in the text editor before you view it with a browser, though you do have to save it.

  • It is generally not necessary to publish your pages on the server before you view them.

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