Publishers of technology books, eBooks, and videos for creative people

Home > Articles > Apple > Operating Systems

Ten Things I Hate About Mac OS X

  • Print
  • + Share This
  • 💬 Discuss
Familiarity breeds contempt, right? So it stands to reason that anyone who uses a product extensively can find fault with it. Owen Linzmayer is no exception: His work requires him to use Mac OS X every day, all day long. Although Owen is generally thrilled with its capabilities and reliability, some things about Mac OS X really drive him up the wall. Take a gander at his list of 10 pet peeves; then share your own!

For more information on the Macintosh, visit our Macintosh Reference Guide or sign up for our Macintosh Newsletter.

By Owen Linzmayer

Familiarity breeds contempt, right? So it stands to reason that anyone who uses a product extensively can find fault with it. I’m no exception—my work requires me to use Mac OS X every day, all day long, and although I am generally thrilled with its capabilities and reliability, some things about it really drive me up the wall. Take a gander at my list of pet peeves; then share your own by posting to the Macintosh Weblog.

1. Dock Items Bounce Indefinitely

Items bounce up and down in the Dock to alert you to situations that supposedly require your attention. My gripe is that the "problem" is usually not urgent. The icon bounces indefinitely, like a needy child demanding your attention, endlessly screaming, "Look at me, Mom, look at me!" This is so annoying and unnecessary it makes me want to scream back, "Listen up ya little punk. I hear ya, but I just don’t care, so shut yer trap!"

Here’s the deal. First of all, there’s nothing that can go wrong in software that requires the immediate intervention of a human, so programs are never justified in distracting you from the task at hand. If a program has a problem and needs your attention, it’s OK for its icon to bounce a few times to visually draw your attention to it. Furthermore, it’s fine for it to beep or use some other innocuous sound effect to audibly alert you to something out of the ordinary. But if you haven’t responded after that, you either chose to ignore the situation or are not around. It would suffice to have some other static visual change (interpretation: subtle and nonannoying) to the application’s icon in the Dock, indicating that it wants your attention when you get around to it.

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account

Discussions

comments powered by Disqus