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From the book Reference 2.6 Deployment Scenarios

Reference 2.6 Deployment Scenarios

An administrator has many significant decisions to make when formulating an Apple deployment plan. This process is further complicated by the interconnected nature of the many available technologies because one technology choice often affects other choices.

Despite this complexity, you can find a management solution by framing your deployment plans around three common deployment scenarios. These three scenarios weren’t arrived at by accident, as Apple has specifically designed the management technologies in iOS and OS X to support them.

Individual Personal Device

This scenario reflects a workflow in which the user personally owns the Apple device, but administrators need to allow access to organizational assets and services. Other common terms used to describe this scenario include “bring your own device” (BYOD) in enterprise environments and “student-owned device” in educational environments.

  • Administrative oversight in this scenario is light to moderate as the device is ultimately under the control of the user.
  • Users can self-enroll the device into an MDM service.
  • Supervision is not an option because the device is owned by the user.
  • The user will probably use a personal Apple ID to access services such as the App Store and iCloud.
  • Administrators can use MDM profiles to grant access to specific resources and enforce security requirements.
  • Administrators can use managed VPP licenses to grant access to apps and books purchased by the organization.

Institutional Personal Device

This scenario reflects a workflow in which the organization owns the Apple device and it’s used by one individual. Other common terms used to describe this scenario include “corporate-owned personal device” in enterprise environments and “one-to-one device” in educational environments.

  • Administrative oversight in this scenario is moderate to high as the device control is shared between the user and administrators.
  • The user can provide the initial configuration by completing the Setup Assistant. The DEP service can be used to enforce supervision and MDM enrollment during the device setup.
  • Each user will have a unique Apple ID. This can be the user’s personal Apple ID or an ID provided by the organization.
  • Administrators can use MDM profiles to grant access to specific resources and enforce security requirements. Supervision will allow for more restrictive management options.
  • Administrators can use managed VPP licenses to remotely grant access to apps and books purchased by the organization.

Institutional Shared Device

This scenario reflects a workflow in which the organization owns the Apple device and it’s shared by multiple users. Other common terms used to describe this scenario include “single-use device” or “kiosk device” in enterprise environments and “shared device” or “cart device” in educational environments.

  • Administrative oversight in this scenario is moderate to heavy as the device is largely controlled by administrators.
  • Administrators will fully control the initial configuration including device supervision and MDM enrollment. This can be managed via the DEP service or Apple Configurator.
  • Administrators will use institutionally shared Apple IDs. In most cases, each Apple ID will be used for multiple devices that share a similar location, such as those stored nightly in a charging cart.
  • Administrators can use the full breadth of MDM configuration and control features, as the devices will also be supervised.
  • Administrators can use managed VPP licenses to grant access to apps and books purchased by the organization. Another option is to deploy apps and documents using Apple Configurator, which will ensure that all devices have the exact same configuration.
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