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Best Practices

Articles

Robert Hoekman

Every so often, bad design wins. Unfortunately, this often results in designers believing that bad design is a good idea. Before you start creating animated GIFs again, take a look at what Robert Hoekman, Jr., has to say about why sites like YouTube, MySpace, and others succeed in spite of their weak designs.

Shari Thurow

Shari Thurow explains how to create a link development strategy that search engines will love.

Dan Cederholm

Dan Cederholm helps you choose the best markup for the job to ensure your site's content is displayed properly across the widest range of browsers and devices.

Spice up your Web pages with the easy-to-use Dreamweaver CS3!

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Blogs

Larry Ullman

Many factors go into the security of a Web site, particularly an e-commerce one. While creating a secure Web application in the first place is a key component, there's an easy way to improve the security of a site over time: by maintaining secure passwords. In this post, I'll explain what this means.

Larry Ullman

A feature of many of today's Web sites is the ability for users to upload files to the server. While often necessary, this process presents a new type of risk to servers and sites, whether any user can upload a file or just an administrator can. In this post, I explain what steps you can take to limit the risks of allowing for file uploads.

Larry Ullman

The bulk of security-related advice is based upon preventing break-ins, hacks, and attacks, but responsible e-commerce developers and administrators know that it's just as important to have created an emergency plan well before trouble occurs. In this post, Larry Ullman talks about why an emergency plan is important and what, exactly, that means.

Larry Ullman

The security of an e-commerce site depends upon so many things: the hosting involved, keeping all the software updated, using secure passwords, and so forth. But when it comes to the software you write--the Web application itself--the most fundamental security concept is that incoming data is validated, validated, and validated. In this post, Larry Ullman writes about what that means, from the concept to the implementation.

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