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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

2.2 Basic Textures

Now consider the same materials with some basic textures added. I could not always find an example of a material-versus-texture pairing. Instead of a brass sheet material and brass sheet texture, for example, I have found brass sheet material and brass doorknob texture. In other instances I have a material and no matching texture—Japanese handmade paper material but no Japanese handmade abused paper. So, you will have to use your imagination in such cases.

In order to achieve a believable representation of a texture in any art style you must understand the subtle nuances that make up the texture; what makes it tick?

Compare the textured versions with the "virgin" materials, exercising your artistic eye to identify the changes. Think of the textures as the layers on top of the base material in your paint package. Each layer has its own history and reason for being there, and in Chapter 1 you were given a number of categories you can consider to differentiate and separate the layers when encountering a surface.

The ability to differentiate between different types of surfaces and materials, as well as determining what makes up the surface and what gives the material its quality, is an important talent to develop. It allows you to make decisions quickly about the surfaces in your work as well as avails you with a new and exciting vocabulary through which to express it.

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