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  1. True Meaning of Volume and Chapter Numbers
  2. Combining Volume/Chapter Numbers with Other Features
  3. Summary
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Combining Volume/Chapter Numbers with Other Features

It's likely that you'll use volume and chapter numbers in combination with other FrameMaker features. In this section, you discover how to add volume and chapter numbers to headers/footers, paragraph numbering, cross-reference format, and generated files.

Headers/Footers

FrameMaker's headers and footers typically comprise a combination of typed text, graphics, and variables that display a variety of information in documents. Take a look at a few methods to include volume and chapter numbers in headers/footers.

Chapter-Based Page Numbering

If you use chapter-based page numbering in documents, you can include the Chapter Number variable along with the page number in a header/footer. From a master page, do the following:

  1. Select Special, Variable; then select Chapter Number from the variable list.

  2. Click Insert. The Chapter Number variable appears as a number on master pages (or however you set the chapter number in the Document Numbering Properties window).

  3. Type a hyphen, then select Special, Variable. Select Current Page # from the Variable list.

  4. Click Insert. The page number appears as a pound sign (#) on master pages.

  5. Switch to body pages. This header/footer displays as 3–6 (if you are on page 6 in Chapter 3).

Instead of inserting a Chapter Number variable, a hyphen, and a current page number variable, you can combine these into one variable. Thus, you insert one variable on a master page to produce the same result.

Here's how it's done from a master page:

  1. Select Special, Variable and then select Current Page # from the Variable list.

  2. Click Edit Definition. The Edit System Variable window is displayed.

  3. Place the insertion cursor just before the current definition, .

  4. Select from the Building Blocks list. is inserted just before .

  5. Type a hyphen between the two definitions, as seen in Figure 1.

    Figure 1Figure 1 You can redefine the Current Page # variable to include both the chapter number and a hyphen.

  6. Click Edit to return to the Edit System Variable window.

  7. Click Insert. The redefined Current Page # variable is inserted at the cursor location.

  8. Switch to body pages. This header/footer displays as 3–6 (if you are on page 6 in Chapter 3).

Tricks with Volume Numbers

The volume and chapter numbers work in exactly the same way. Although I discuss volume numbers in this section, you can apply the same techniques to chapter numbers.

Let's explore how to work creatively in FrameMaker with volume numbers. Let's say that a 16-chapter book is divided into four parts, and each part includes four chapters. Thus, each chapter header contains the volume number and chapter number:

Part I, Chapter 1 This is the title

In this case, first set the Format, Document, Numbering, Volume property to Volume #: 1, Format: ROMAN. The next three chapter files in a book are set to Use Same Numbering As Previous File, whereas the fifth chapter file in a book is set to Continue Numbering From Previous File in Book. In this case, because four chapter files complete each part, only file numbers 5, 9, and 13 are set to Continue Numbering. All the remaining files must be set to Use Same Numbering As Previous File in order for the Volume number to be correct.

Next, set the Document Numbering for Chapter to Chapter #: 1, Format: Numeric (all subsequent files in a book are set to Continue Numbering from Previous File in Book).

Insert this combination of variables and text in a background text frame:

Part Volume Number, Chapter Chapter Number Running H/F 1

In this case, Running H/F 1 is defined as . (Any paragraph tagged with Title is referenced in this running header.)

You can also use a Volume Number to insert a document title or some other textual information that you want to display in a header/footer on each page of your document.

In this example, let's say that the header must display something like this:

User Guide Chapter 1 This is the title

In this case, first set the Format, Document, Numbering, Volume property to Volume #: User Guide, Format: Text. All subsequent chapter files in a book are set to Use Same Numbering As Previous File.

Next, set the Document Numbering for Chapter to: Chapter #: 1, Format: Numeric (all subsequent files in a book are set to Continue Numbering from Previous File in Book).

Insert this combination of variables and text in a background text frame:

Volume Number, Chapter Chapter Number Running H/F 1

In this case, Running H/F 1 is defined as (any paragraph tagged with Title is referenced in this running header).

Paragraph Numbering

You can use standard paragraph numbering in combination with volume and chapter numbers. Let's say a document contains three levels of headings numbered 1, 1.1, 1.1.1, and so on; figures numbered 1-1, 1-2, and so on; and tables numbered 1-1, 1-2, and so on.

For each file, use the chapter number to produce the number in the first position, and use standard numbering building blocks to produce the subsequent position numbers.

There are multiple techniques available to produce this result. Following is one example of paragraph numbering properties for each of these paragraphs:

Head1: H:

Head2: H: .<n+>

Head3: H: .<n>.<n+>

Figure: F: -<n+>

Table: T: -<n+>

In this case, after you include each file in a book, you must do the following:

Format, Document, Numbering, Chapter: to set the number that corresponds to . For the first file in a book, set Chapter # to 1; set subsequent files to Continue Numbering From Previous File in Book.

Format, Document, Numbering, Paragraph: to set standard numbering building blocks to Restart Paragraph Numbering or Continue Numbering From Previous Paragraph in Book. You must Restart for each new chapter using the above scenario.

If you do not set Numbering Paragraph properties correctly, here's an example of what you might end up with:

Chapter 1: 1, 1.1, 1.2, Figure 1-1, 1-2

Chapter 2: 2, 2,3, Figure 2-3, 2-4

Cross-References

The secret to cross-references is in cross-reference formats. After you determine the information you want to cross-reference, formats determine how that information is displayed.

If you include chapter numbers as part of the page number, you must include this information in cross-references that display page numbers. That's where the volume or chapter numbers come in handy.

Again, keep in mind that wherever you use volume and chapter numbers within a document, the displayed information corresponds to the information in the Document, Numbering settings for Volume or Chapter.

Here are a couple of example of cross-reference formats and how they are displayed in text:

Format

How It's Displayed

See Figure on page -

When the chapter number is set to 2, Format: Numeric

See Figure 2-3 on page 2-17.

See , Chapter ,

When the volume number is set to User Guide, Format: Text; and the chapter number is set to 3, Format: Numeric

See User Guide, Chapter 3, "This is the title."


Generated Files

Among FrameMaker's many cool features is the capability to create generated files such as tables of contents, indexes, lists of figures, and other types of lists.

You can configure generated lists in a number of ways. If your documents used chapter-based page numbering, you must incorporate the chapter number building block into the generated list format structure in order to produce the correct page number.

If table of contents list items are to appear as follows:

Chapter 3 This is the title 3-1
Note to Nancy: above should be the leader dots that separate a table of contents entry from the page number on the right.

These Building Blocks on the TOC reference page produce the correct result:

Chapter \t-

As you can see, you must add the Building Block to complete the chapter-based, page-numbering sequence.

In the same way, if you generate an index, you must add the Building Block to the Building Block structure on the IX reference page to produce chapter-based page numbers for each index entry.

You must insert - just before the Building Block on the IX reference page, as seen in Figure 2.

Figure 2Figure 2 Insert just before the Building Block on the IX reference page.

Gotchas

Even though you might not actually be using the volume or chapter number in a particular file, you cannot suppress this number from appearing in a generated file if you use the building block in a generated file.

Here is how a problem occurs:

Let's say that you are working with a book file that includes a Preface page numbered as i, ii, iii, and so on; and a chapters page numbered as 2-1, 2-2, 2-3 (for Chapter 2) and so on.

In order to include the chapter prefix with the page number in the table of contents or index, you use the methods discussed previously. However, you run into a problem with page numbers of tables of contents and index entries extracted from the Preface file. The Preface page numbers have no prefix. Therefore, if you use

-$pagenum>

to produce the page numbers in the table of contents or index, the Preface page numbers would also look like this:

1-i, 1-ii, 1- iii...

To solve this problem in an Index, please read my article, "Working with Multiple Page Number Styles in an Index in FrameMaker."

To solve this problem in a table of contents, create a separate paragraph tag for the Preface title, and include that paragraph tag in the Set Up Table of Contents window. Now you end up with one paragraph tag (ChapterTitle) that represents all chapter titles that use chapter-based page numbers, and 1 paragraph tag (PrefixTitle) that represents the prefix title.

On the TOC reference page, add the Building Block to the structure that represents ChapterTitle, but do not add it to the line that represents PrefixTitle.

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